Author Archive: Mari S. Gold

Mari S. Gold

Mari S. Gold is a freelance writer who contributes to many magazines and websites. Her blog, But I Digress… , on cultural events, travel, food  and other topics is at www.marigoldonline.net. She lives in New York City.

Legacy 36 Celebrates the Stars—A Line of Former Rockettes

Legacy Dancers Performing New York, New York

The famed Radio City Music Hall Rockettes, that high-kicking, glam- or- bust line of tap dancing women, began in St. Louis as the Missouri Rockets. The troop was brought to New York City to perform at the Roxy Theater where they were known as the Roxyettes and then, as part of the Christmas spectacular, came to Radio City, where they were rechristened The Rockettes.

Limón Dance Company, Joyce Theater, May 2, 2017

The José Limón Dance Company in Concerto Grosso

This program combines the contemporary with the classics in the first Joyce season under the Company’s new artistic director, Colin Connor.

The final work of the altogether gripping evening was made in 2016 with choreography by Kate Ware. Night Light is partly set to the Passacaglia for unaccompanied violin from Biber’s “The Rosary” Sonata and partly to “A Song for Mick Kelly.” The athletic dancers, some of the women wearing what closely resembled black two-piece ‘bathing suits;’ the rest of the group in flowing dark and royal blue tops, weave and leap, almost fighting one another. The work is powerful and haunting. The other 2016 dance, Corvidae, choreographed by Mr. Connor, turns the dancers into Corvids, i.e., crows and ravens, who have been seen throughout the ages as messengers. The dark lighting and black costumes gave the six dancers an edge of menace further expressed by darting, flicking movements.

The Ensemble for the Romantic Century presents The Dreyfus Affair at BAM

The Dreyfus Affair, Ensemble

The Dreyfus Affair feels very appropriate in today’s xenophobic, anxious times. Combining live orchestral music, singing, spoken word, projections and elaborate period costumes , the production relates the chilling story of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a decorated French Jewish officer, who was falsely accused of high treason, arrested, speedily tried, convicted and imprisoned on the hell-hole of Devil’s Island. Written by Eve Wolf and directed by Donald T. Sanders, this multi-media production illuminates the 1894 events that had a decades-long reverberation in the political landscape of France and the rest of the world and still reverberates.

Mind AND Matter: Sam & Dede, or My Dinner with André the Giant at 59 E 59

Brendan Averett as Andre the Giant and Dave Sikula as Samuel Beckett in Sam & Dede, or my Dinner with Andre the Giant at 59E59 Theaters. Photo Jay Yamada.

True story: Irish writer Samuel Beckett, who lived most of his life in France, met and befriended the son of a neighbor, a very large young man known as Andre the Giant. Beckett drove Andre, called Dede, to school in his truck because Dede’s huge size made riding the regular school bus impossible. During the drives together, Beckett and Andre spent a lot of their time talking about cricket.

The Museum Workout, Monica Bill Barnes & Company, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Monica Bill Barnes troupe exercised their way through the Met's armor court, the author front and center.

I saw Monica Bill Barnes & Company a few years ago when the troupe performed Three Acts, Two Dancers, One Radio Host which I found very entertaining. This experience was just as engaging but in a very different way. About fifteen women gathered before the museum opened and were ushered to the Education Area to put away coats and anything else we’d brought. We were told to wait “and stretch if you like.” After a brief introduction from Robbie Saenz de Viteri, the company’s Creative Producing Director, we were led to the foot of the great stairs where Monica Bill Barnes and her longtime dance partner, Anna Bass, both in sequined gowns and sneakers, greeted us.

The Dessoff Choirs’ Messiah Sing, 2017, Malcolm J. Merriweather, Music Director, Conducting

Malcolm J. Merriweather, Music Director of the Dessoff Choirs.

For me, the holiday season is officially here when I sing the Messiah, George Frederic Handel’s oratorio composed in 1741 that has become one of the most performed works in Western choral music. This year I was fortunate enough to join the Dessoff Choirs under the direction of Malcolm J. Merriweather, Musical Director. Some of the group that assembled at Union Theological Seminary regularly sing with Dessoff; others, like me, were rank amateurs whose voices have darkened over the years but whose enthusiasm remains robust. It doesn’t matter in the least and there are enough strong voices to mask any missed notes from people like me.