Author Archive: Roza Tulyaganova

Soprano Roza Tulyaganova, DMA, is a native of Uzbekistan. Since moving to the United States in 2000, she has traveled extensively, performing major and supporting opera roles in cities across the country. Miss Tulyaganova pursued and completed her Master of Music degree at the Manhattan School of Music from 2005-2007. At MSM, she performed the roles of Livia in L’Italiana in Londra and La Ciesca in Gianni Schicchi. Before attending the Manhattan School of Music, Miss Tulyaganova performed roles with many opera companies throughout the East Coast. These include Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi with Mississippi Opera, Musetta in La Bohème with Cantiamo Opera Theatre in New York, and Micaëla in Carmen with the Brooklyn-Queens Conservatory. From 2002-2004, Miss Tulyaganova performed in numerous scenes with Opera Las Vegas, including Mimí in La Bohème, the title role in Lakmé, and Frasquita in Carmen. With the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, she has sung the roles of Rosalinda in Die Fledermaus and Lola in Gallantry, as well as appearing in UNLV’s opera scenes program as Musetta in La Bohème and Violetta in La Traviata. Her Fiordiligi at the Hubbard Hall Opera and her Countess in the Capital Opera’s Marriage of Figaro have been warmly acclaimed. Miss Tulyaganova has appeared as a soloist in many concert engagements, including Brahms’ A German Requiem with the Las Vegas Music Arts Orchestra, Handel’s Messiah with the Las Vegas Philharmonic Orchestra, and a Russian Music Recital with the Las Vegas Russian Trio. Miss Tulyaganova is the winner of multiple notable awards. These include being a two-time district winner at the Metropolitan National Council Auditions, a district winner of the 2002 NATSAA competition, a winner of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas concerto competition, and a finalist in the Meistersinger Competition in Graz, Austria. She holds a Doctor of Musical Arts from Stony Brook University.

She has also designed and made dresses for her own recitals and for fellow singers.

Mussorgsky’s Khovanshchina Revisits the Met after 13 Years

Anatoli Kotscherga as Ivan Khovansky in Mussorgsky's €œKhovananshchina.€ Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera.

Even if the performance had not been as great as it was, we both, as newcomers to Khovanshchina, would have left the Met in a state of uncritical awe. Mussorgsky’s historical tragedy, although the composer left it unorchestrated and unfinished at his early death, leaving a great deal of work for others, including Rimsky-Korsakov, Ravel, Stravinsky, and Shostakovich in their separate efforts, has all the potency the greatest music and the most powerful human drama can lend it—all within a setting of the grandest spectacle. As the Met presented it earlier this month, its four and a half hours sped by, as we followed the hopeless and ultimately disastrous adventures of key players of various factions in the unstable years of Peter the Great’s minority. Even Mussorgsky’s finished opera, his acknowledged masterpiece, Boris Godunov, does not leave us with such an overwhelmingly cathartic effect as the inexorable succession of assassinations, executions, and suicides with which Khovanshchina concludes. Mussorgsky, who wrote the libretto as well as the music, seems to have captured the tragic essence of history in it. There was a specific reason why the final effect of the Met performance was so moving, but to explain it, a little background is in order.



Vivica Genaux, Mezzo-Soprano, sings Vivaldi Pyrotechnics, with Europa Galante led by Fabio Biondi

Vivica Genaux. Photo Christian Steiner.

When Vivica showed up on stage you could hear people’s rapture. She wore a black dress that complimented her beautiful complexion with a red flower on the left shoulder. She looked absolutely stunning. I’ve never heard Vivica before, and I must say that she has one of the most gorgeous voices. It’s not big, but for Baroque one doesn’t need a big voice. Right away, Vivica strikes you with her vocal technique. All the tempi were so fast that one would wonder, how in the world can anyone sing so fast? And not every ensemble can play that fast either. But both Vivica and Europa Galante showed the highest class of musicianship and technique.



Wagner’s Rienzi with the Opera Orchestra of New York under Eve Queler – a Review

Rienzi was totally new to me, although Eve Queler’s interview on New York Arts gave me some idea of what to expect. Still I was really surprised to hear music that seemed to come straight out of Bellini and reminded me even of some Verdi at times. This is most definitely not the Wagner we know from Tristan and Parsifal, and Wagner most certainly didn’t want us to know him by it. Although Rienzi was a great success at its premiere, made him famous, and continued to be popular through his lifetime and beyond, he repudiated the opera, once he hit his stride in Der fliegende Holländer, Tannhäuser, and Lohengrin, and supported performances only as far back as the Holländer, his next work, which he actually began before he finished Rienzi. He worked on Rienzi from the summer of 1837 to through October 1840. During this time he took up a post at the opera house in Riga, where he stayed until he was dismissed in 1839. He had to leave the country in secret to escape his creditors, setting out for Paris, where he struggled to survive, as he tried unsuccessfully to interest the Paris Opera in Rienzi.



Don Giovanni at the Met x 2

Metropolitan Opera House Don Giovanni Mozart-Da Ponte Conductor – Louis Langrée Continuo: Dennis Giauque, Harpsichord David Heiss, Cello Mandolin Solo: Joyce Rasmussen Balint Production – Marthe Keller Set Designer – Michael Yeargan Costume Designer – Christine Rabot-Pinson Lighting Designer –…
Read more



A tip for our readers: How to get the most out of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review for the Arts.
What if I hate reading on computer screens, even tablets?
We get occasional inquiries from readers about whether we plan to launch a print edition of our arts journals. The answer is that we've given it some thought, and we're still thinking about it.
It is not only our older readers who object to reading them online. There are even some millennials who would rather read from paper. One of our readers got the simple idea of using the sites as sophisticated tables of contents. She prints out each article on three-hole paper and files them in a loose-leaf album. I've devoted a lot of time to finding the very best print and pdf facility there is. Just click on one of the icons at the top right of the article and print!
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to The Arts Press, publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Or click on the notice in the sidebar. The Arts Press is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the charitable purposes of The Arts Press must be made payable to“Fractured Atlas” only and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.