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Archive for the ‘Drawings’ Category

Thumbnail : Bernini Sculpting in Clay, at the Met, closed Jan. 6 2013; at the Kimbell, Fort Worth, February 3 – April 14, 2013

Bernini Sculpting in Clay, at the Met, closed Jan. 6 2013; at the Kimbell, Fort Worth, February 3 – April 14, 2013

Bernini Sculpting in Clay The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York October 3, 2012 – January 6, 2013 Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth February 3 – April 14, 2013 Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) dazzled his contemporaries and dominated the city of Rome. He was an artist equally brilliant at sculpture, architecture, and painting, rising from […]

Thumbnail : Old Master Drawings, the successor to The Drawing Site, is now online.

Old Master Drawings, the successor to The Drawing Site, is now online.

Old Master Drawings, the successor to The Drawing Site, is now online. In it, Michael Miller offers articles about the history of drawing, the history of collecting, a reference work on the materials and techniques of drawing, and a page of news in the world of drawings: exhibitions, lectures, conferences, etc. There is also a […]

Thumbnail : Le Salon du Dessin 2012 – UPDATE: Jorinde Voigt has won the Contemporary Drawing Prize of the Daniel & Florence Guerlain Art Foundation.

Le Salon du Dessin 2012 – UPDATE: Jorinde Voigt has won the Contemporary Drawing Prize of the Daniel & Florence Guerlain Art Foundation.

Knowing the Salon du Dessin at first hand, and contemplating its 2012 iteration, I find myself thinking back on on the world of master drawings as it was when I first entered it in 1980 and how it has changed over the years. Attended by over 13,000 people in 2010, the Salon is a large, public event which spans five days. It brings together the larger part of the world’s curators, scholars, collectors, and dealers in the field in a busy, but rarely overcrowded public space, the Palais de la Bourse. One can survey the available stock at the dealers’ stands, attend conferences, lectures, and guided tours, visit exhibitions at the Bourse and at Paris museums, as well as satellite enterprises around the Hôtel Drouot, where drawings can be had at auction, and further afield. There is a wealth of opportunities to learn about drawings, as well as to collect them. In 1980, no one thought that a fair of this size might ever exist in the field, and in its early years, during the 1990s, no one ever thought it would grow to these dimensions.

Thumbnail : Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan, The National Gallery of Art, London, November 9, 2011 – February 5, 2012

Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan, The National Gallery of Art, London, November 9, 2011 – February 5, 2012

The crowds begin as one approaches the rear of the building: a long line, snaking back on itself contains those hopeful of gaining one of the 500 tickets on sale each day; further on, is a smaller queue of the luckier ones who had snapped up all the online tickets during the first three days of sale. Overall, the crowds are well behaved—for this is England—and approach their goal with good humor and a touch of the spirit of Dunkirk as they descend upon the National Gallery’s runaway success, Leonardo: Painter at the Court of Milan. It is not a large show, only some sixty paintings and drawings, but then Leonardo only began a score of paintings in a career spanning four decades. Of those paintings, fifteen autograph works survive, and four of these are generally deemed incomplete. To assemble almost every surviving painting from Leonardo’s Milanese period in London is a notable achievement, and these works are supplemented by others associated with his followers and sometime collaborators in the most sustained period of productivity in the artist’s life.

Thumbnail : Pre-Raphaelite Drawings at the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Pre-Raphaelite Drawings at the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Pollinated with the spirit of the Renaissance, spring-like, fresh and full of individual passion and wonder, the Pre Raphaelites went back to a state of painting when the Renaissance was in its stride if not its prime. Rather than seeing painting as a continuous development up to their own day, they when back to an approach and a world view at a point when art knew where it was going, striving toward a most sublime peak, a peak attained perhaps twice in western human history. The Pre Raphaelites took as their teachers and masters those of Titian’s, Michelangelo’s and Raphael’s and via intelligent imitation that went beyond mere copying they progressed, very roughly speaking, through the styles of the Italian Renaissance, and at times managed to break free of their teachers’ styles. They even wrote poems too. One can see something of this progression in the quite broad and thorough collection of their drawings and watercolors currently on display in the Art Gallery of New South Wales, most of which come from the Tate and the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

Thumbnail : Figure, Memorie, Spazio: disegni da Fra’Angelico a Leonardo (Sala delle Reali Poste, Galleria degli Uffizi) and La Grafica del Quattrocento: appunti di teoria, conoscenza e gusto (Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi), Florence. Closed June 12th.

Figure, Memorie, Spazio: disegni da Fra’Angelico a Leonardo (Sala delle Reali Poste, Galleria degli Uffizi) and La Grafica del Quattrocento: appunti di teoria, conoscenza e gusto (Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi), Florence. Closed June 12th.

The first step towards understanding Renaissance drawing is to take stock of the plethora of reasons for its existence, ranging from doodles to elaborate studies in human anatomy. What started as a design for sculpture may well have evolved into a preparatory sketch for painting. Drawing was the artist’s way of jotting down an idea before losing it and before knowing precisely what, if anything, it might develop into later.

Thumbnail : Master Drawings New York 2010

Master Drawings New York 2010

Master Drawings New York 2010 Preview: Friday January 22, 4pm to 9pm Galleries open: Saturday January 23 through Saturday January 30 Saturdays 11am–5pm Sunday January 24, 3pm–7pm Mon–Fri 11am–6pm Telephone enquiries: +1 212 755 8500 Web: http://www.masterdrawingsinnewyork.com For the fourth year Master Drawings New York will bring together a distinguished group of dealers from Europe and the United States […]

Thumbnail : The Burt Britton Collection at Bloomsbury Auctions, New York, 9/24/09

The Burt Britton Collection at Bloomsbury Auctions, New York, 9/24/09

Portrait of the Artist: The Burt Britton Collection at Bloomsbury Auctions, New York, NY Thursday, September 24th at 2:00pm Only in New York could a man like Burt Britton pursue successive careers as bartender and bookseller, both equally supportive for his passion for the arts, especially the arts of the word. His enthusiasm came to […]

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  • A Singer’s Notes 101: Except ye become as children …
    My weekend has been dominated by children, their thoughts, and my thoughts about them. Charles Dickens, a passionate admirer of little ones, finds his most searing location for them in his beloved A Christmas Carol. Even the death of Little Dorrit lacks the resonance that this short novella has shown. The attachment with Christmas is […]
    Keith Kibler
  • The BEMF Chamber Operas 2014: Pergolesi’s La serva padrona and Livietta e Tracollo
    Pergolesi’s comic operas sound remarkably modern—which is to say, like Mozart. Recognizably human characters go through recognizable experiences, singing out their feelings very directly, which the music embodies in fluidly changing tempos and moods, stretching of harmony, changes of key and orchestral color. Much is accomplished through musically creative recitative—a half-spoken way of proceeding—as well […]
    Charles Warren
  • What is and what might have been: More Nelsons at the BSO, Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra
    I couldn’t have been more eager to hear Riccardo Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra on their return visit to Boston, part of an American tour celebrating the 25th anniversary of the “Peaceful Revolution” that began in Leipzig in October 1989 and a month later led to the fall of the Berlin wall. Chailly continues […]
    Lloyd Schwartz
  • A Singer’s Notes 100: Shakespeare and Company’s Fall Festival
    A good while ago now, I stepped into an ancient school bus, left a tiny hamlet in the foothills of the Adirondacks, and traveled to the glittering metropolis of Johnstown, New York. There, The Tempest was being played by a traveling troupe, and somehow our country school got us there. The play was The Tempest. […]
    Keith Kibler

New York Arts is dedicated to bringing you the best critical writing about the arts, in-depth, and written by passionate, engaging writers.

 
Every page on the site is free, and so are subscriptions to our email updates.
 
New York Arts survives on your voluntary support.
 
Why?
 
A. Our writers are professionals and should be paid for their work, and so should the editors, who also carry out the everyday tasks of maintaining the site and business.
 
B. There are daily costs in maintaining the site, transportation, professional expenses, and so on...to a long list.
 
C. The editor currently takes on all the administrative work. We need a specialized assistant/administrator.
 
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to The Arts Press, publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Or click on the notice in the sidebar. The Arts Press is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the charitable purposes of The Arts Press must be made payable to“Fractured Atlas” only and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.
 
If you enjoy what your read here, support New York Arts and keep serious criticism alive! You won't find it in your local newspaper anymore!