​Thorns of the Crown, Choreographed and Staged by Ramon Oller

Ramon Oller's Thorns of the Crown, after Shakespeare

The phrase “less is more,” attributed to many sources, is very appropriate for Thorns of the Crown. The dance is vaguely about royal power—wanting it, getting it, losing it. This is a strong theme but the piece is a potpourri of steps, sounds, ideas, music and musical styles and would be stronger had it focused on fewer. Sounds include clashing swords and whinnying horses with snatches of spoken Shakespeare including Macbeth and Hamlet, with “To Be or Not to Be” voiced by Kenneth Branagh. Music runs the gamut from quasi- (or perhaps genuine) ecclesiastical to medieval selections to pipes and flutes to a blend of original compositions by composers Thomas Lentakis and Bruno Axel with too-abrupt shifts that are jolting.

Mozart Dances by the Mark Morris Dance Group at Mostly Mozart, Lincoln Center, August 26, 2016

The Mostly Mozart  Festival presents the Mark Morris Dance Group performing "Mozart Dances" in a World Premiere with Louis Langree conductor of the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra  and Emanuel Ax on Piano, at the New York State Theater on August 16, 2006.
The 3 dances were:
"Eleven" - Women in Black long see through dress-female soloist is Lauren Grant- short woman in black dress
"Double"- Men in White shirts , women in white long skirts, 
Male soloist is Joe Bowie (in black jacket)
"Twenty-seven"- dancers in white outfits
Credit:  ©Stephanie Berger

Many choreographers go out of their way to avoid the music of Mozart fearing their work won’t (or can’t) approach the same level of artistry. Happily, Mark Morris is not among them. His Mozart Dances, originally commissioned by Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the New Crowned Hope Festival in Vienna and London’s Barbican Centre ten years ago, has dancers swirling and bouncing through a piano sonata and two piano concertos, almost all with the inspired touch of two masters.

Ariel Rivka Dance 9th Season Festival—A Mixed Bag of Modern Dance: Works by Ariel Grossman, Pascal Rioult, Heidi Latsky and Elisa King

Ariel Rivka Dance. Photo David Gonsier.

Strong women are the hallmark of this modern dance program featuring works by Ariel Grossman, Pascal Rioult, Heidi Latsky and Elisa King. Male dancers also take the stage, notably in Grossman’s Variations on a Box, the final piece, and one of the most powerfully engaging, as the dancers push and shove one another, abruptly fall to the ground, rise and move as a group with small, shuffling steps.

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