Opera

Richard Wagner, Der Ring des Nibelungen: Siegfried, Royal Opera House Covent Garden under Antonio Pappano with John Tomlinson as Wotan

When, in my review of his recent performance to Haydn’s Creation, I was reflecting on Sir Colin Davis’ career, I mentioned the Ring Cycle he conducted at Covent Garden in 1976. I thought that Siegfried was the most successful of the performances, because Sir Colin seemed to have fallen in love with its spectacular score. In no other work are the beauties of Wagner’s composition so constantly and so openly present. As I sat raptly in my seat, the orchestra and all the wonderful qualities Sir Colin could reveal in it were without a doubt the focus of my attention. And so it is for most of us in most performances, past or present, whether it is Furtwängler, Knappertsbusch, Solti, Böhm (whose splendid Bayreuth performances, available on Philips, should be better remembered), Boulez, or Levine. The orchestra functions as storyteller—a surpassingly eloquent one, with all the resources of Wagner’s musical imagination.

Richard Wagner, Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Metropolitan Opera: Morris, Hei-Kyung Hong, Polenzani

[caption id="attachment_1593" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Kyung Hong as Eva and James Morris as Hans Sachs, photo: Beatriz Schiller/Metropolitan Opera"]Kyung Hong as Eva and James Morris as Hans Sachs, photo: Beatriz Schiller/Metropolitan Opera[/caption]

The Metropolitan Opera, New York, March 10, 2007, 12
pm

Eva: Hei-Kyung Hong
Magdalene: Maria

Bard Music Festival 2009 – Wagner and His World, August 14-16 and August 21-23, 2009

Of all the events in the year, I can’t think of anything I anticipate quite as keenly as the Bard Music Festival, which is dedicated to exploring the life and works of major composers in the broad context of the culture in which they lived.

[caption id="attachment_256" align="alignright" width="298" caption="Richard Wagner in 1873"]Richard Wagner in 1873[/caption]

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