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A tip for our readers: How to get the most out of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review for the Arts.
What if I hate reading on computer screens, even tablets?
We get occasional inquiries from readers about whether we plan to launch a print edition of our arts journals. The answer is that we've given it some thought, and we're still thinking about it.
It is not only our older readers who object to reading them online. There are even some millennials who would rather read from paper. One of our readers got the simple idea of using the sites as sophisticated tables of contents. She prints out each article on three-hole paper and files them in a loose-leaf album. I've devoted a lot of time to finding the very best print and pdf facility there is. Just click on one of the icons at the top right of the article and print!
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to The Arts Press, publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Or click on the notice in the sidebar. The Arts Press is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the charitable purposes of The Arts Press must be made payable to“Fractured Atlas” only and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.
Fisher Center, Bard College, Spring Events 2015
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The Latest on New York Arts

Injustice for All: Lucy Thurber's The Insurgents at the Labyrinth Theater

February 25th, 2015

by: Mari S. Gold

very character in The Insurgents, a new play by Lucy Thurber at The Bank Street Theater, is or has been disenfranchised. Sally Wright, played by Cassie Beck, has lost her athletic scholarship and returns to a dead-end, no hope town in the rural Northeast, joining her father, a drinker and womanizer and h[...]

Hugh Leonard's Da, Revived at the Irish Repertory Theatre

February 22nd, 2015

by: Michael Miller

After its impressive fall production of Conor McPherson's Port Authority (2001), the Irish Rep has moved on to an older play from an older generation, Hugh Leonard's Da (1978), which was a huge success in New York and on a ten-month American tour, winning all three of the major Best Play awards in 1978, the[...]

New Vintage Baroque and Damask Ensemble - Fated Lovers Tour in NYC - Early music meets new music in an international collaboration!

February 16th, 2015

by: The Editor

From February 26-March 1, 2015, New Vintage Baroque (a period instrument ensemble from New York, USA) and Damask Ensemble (a vocal quartet from The Hague, Netherlands) will present a series of concerts entitled Fated Lovers in multiple Manhattan venues.[...]

Andris Nelsons in Boston...with Two Superb Concerts under the BSO's New Assistant Conductor, Ken-David Masur, and an Appreciation of James Levine

February 15th, 2015

by: Charles Warren

Andris Nelsons has garnered a lot of attention during his first season as Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra—much coverage in the local and even national press; receptions for the public and an exhibition with a talking hologram at Symphony Hall; placards on buses around Boston and in the s[...]

Ballet 422, a Film by Jody Lee Lipes at Lincoln Center

February 15th, 2015

by: Mari S. Gold

Just after Justin Peck goes on stage to acknowledge the applause as the choreographer of Paz de la Jolla, a new ballet, he leaves and goes backstage. He walks to a small dressing room where he takes off his dark suit, puts on makeup and his costume and, responding to the [...]

Scriabin lives again at Carnegie Hall! With Mendelssohn, Debussy, Brahms, and Schumann. Riccardo Muti conducting the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, with Yefim Bronfman

February 8th, 2015

by: Michael Miller

One can't help feeling mildly shocked when one realizes that the Chicago Symphony is now alone among the great American orchestras in employing one of the great senior conductors as Music Director. Michael Tilson Thomas in San Francisco is close to him in age, but nowhere near him in authority.[...]

Hector Berlioz, Les Troyens, Boston Symphony Orchestra, James Levine, conductor

February 7th, 2015

by: The Editor

Les Troyens is so widely accepted as Berlioz’s greatest work, that the progress of the Berlioz Renaissance is punctuated by performances of it in the opera house and in concert, beginning, arguably, with Sir Thomas Beecham’s moderately abridged 1947 BBC broadcast. Now Boston music-lovers may consider the Berlioz Renaissance to be some[...]

My (Trite) Old Kentucky Home

February 4th, 2015

by: Mari S. Gold

Kentucky Cantata by Paul David Young is supposed to be about issues of important issues of our time including violence against women, race and immigration. However, it doesn’t rise to the importance of these.[...]

Ivan Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra Perform Brahms' First and Third Symphonies

January 31st, 2015

by: Steven Kruger

Think what you will about San Francisco, but nobody ever said it was Hungarian! You might have been fooled yesterday at Davies Hall, though, rubbing elbows with an enthusiastic elderly audience assembled for Iván Fischer's Budapest Festival Orchestra. Sunday attendees do normally look a bit older, retired Stanford and Berkeley faculty perhaps, in fro[...]

Wagner, Tannhäuser Overture. Sibelius, Symphony No. 2 - the BSO's first recording under Andris Nelsons

January 25th, 2015

by: Steven Kruger

I don’t think I have heard the Boston Symphony sound this full and deep since Koussevitzky. This CD inaugurates Andris Nelsons’ era at the helm of the BSO and signals a reinforcement of the orchestra’s considerable strengths in the more brooding side of the continental repertory.[...]

Opera and Passion: Boston Lyric Opera, Boston Early Music Festival, and Odyssey Opera

January 4th, 2015

by: Lloyd Schwartz

Is there a more passionate art form than opera? In what other mode is the uninhibited expression of feeling—tragic or comic—so central? More central than reason. Given the emotional liberation of great music, what can in a mere plot description appear to be absurd (a woman tossing the wrong baby int[...]

The Bach Choir of Bethlehem's Christmas Concert, a Review and Interview with Music Director Greg Funfgeld—to Air on Christmas Day at 8pm on WWFM

December 24th, 2014

by: Michael Miller

Where was the first documented performance of a Bach cantata in this country? Where were the St. John Passion, the Christmas Oratorio, the B Minor Mass, and the Art of Fugue first performed complete here? Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.[...]


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A tip for our readers: How to get the most out of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review for the Arts.
What if I hate reading on computer screens, even tablets?
We get occasional inquiries from readers about whether we plan to launch a print edition of our arts journals. The answer is that we've given it some thought, and we're still thinking about it.
It is not only our older readers who object to reading them online. There are even some millennials who would rather read from paper. One of our readers got the simple idea of using the sites as sophisticated tables of contents. She prints out each article on three-hole paper and files them in a loose-leaf album. I've devoted a lot of time to finding the very best print and pdf facility there is. Just click on one of the icons at the top right of the article and print!
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to The Arts Press, publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Or click on the notice in the sidebar. The Arts Press is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the charitable purposes of The Arts Press must be made payable to“Fractured Atlas” only and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.