Tag Archive: Haydn

Better on Paper? Gerald Finley’s Winterreise, Kirill Gerstein’s Piano Recital in Boston

Viktor Hartmann (1834–1873), Paris Catacombs

I can’t think of any musical event this season I was more looking forward to than Canadian baritone Gerald Finley singing Schubert’s Winterreise at Jordan Hall (February 7), and I’d been almost equally excited about hearing Russian-born pianist Kirill Gerstein return to Boston for a full length Jordan Hall piano recital (January 31). Both concerts were sponsored by the Celebrity Series of Boston, and both sounded great on paper.

A Visit to the “Southland”—Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos and the LA Philharmonic in Disney Hall

Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos in 1959

It wasn’t, I confess, the originality of the afternoon’s program, which drew me to attend the Sunday concert recently at Disney Hall, but its likely mastery. I was in “The Southland” (as we say in California) in futile search of fahrenheit and friendly sands, only to encounter wet-suits, dogs at the beach and windswept desertion in the face of the same cold-snap that immobilized the East a few days later. But I warmed to the thought of seeing Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos perform again.

Looking Back and Looking Forward: Takács String Quartet in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series

The Takács Quartet. Photo by Richard Houghton.

Lincoln Center: October 25 2012 Haydn – String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Britten – String Quartet No. 2 Shostakovich – Piano Quintet Marc-André Hamelin – piano The Takács Quartet Edward Dusinberre – violin Károly Schranz – violin Geraldine Walther…
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The Proms: Haitink and Perahia with the Vienna Philharmonic

Perennial spring. The Vienna Philharmonic never wants for love and respect, being showered with both almost beyond measure. Their PR department must consist of an answering machine that says, “Thanks for adoring us. Maybe we’ll call you back.” Since their principal season is spent in the opera house, the Philharmonic gives few orchestral concerts compared with the world’s other premiere ensembles. After earning raves and an audience hanging from the rafters at the Proms this summer, these august visitors were described by one London critic as “lifetime members of the high table.” It’s become de rigeur to carp about the absence of women in the orchestra (I counted three), but otherwise, a critic might as well push a macro key on his computer set to endless praise.

Gluck, Hummel and Haydn Concertos with the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra and Keyed Trumpeter Gabriele Cassone

The first three programs of the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra this year have made a nice historical progression from the late Baroque of Vivaldi, to that of central Europe and England with Bach, Zelenka and Handel, now to the late classical period. The fortepiano has come out to replace the harpsichord and the orchestra grown with thicker string sections and clarinets to bring us Haydn and the Italian trumpet virtuoso Gabriele Cassone. For the Haydn G major Symphony, the so-called “Surprise,” Paul Dyer conducts from behind the fortepiano bench, and lays chords oftentimes too while using his body and shoulders to conduct. Though we can catch at times some of the period reproduction fortepiano’s beautiful sonorities, it is too large a hall really to do it justice and often it gets swallowed in the orchestra, but no matter, that is not its purpose here, though it does make a slight difference in color. What is important is that with the larger (late) classical orchestra, the conductor is necessary and conductorly music-making is readily audible here. With more dynamic possibilities from the backed-up strings, and timpani, and opportunities to use them thanks to Haydn (not to mention Gluck!) — and Maestro Dyer (though he never gives himself the label “conductor”) does know how to use it — the orchestra adapts naturally and readily to the new-sounding late 18th century palate. The strings have more solidity, they are still clear, very precise, with guest concertmaster Madeleine Easton leading them with her beautiful playing, but with more structure, polished but with a fine texture by virtue of the gut strings and the varied shapes and sizes of the violins. The orchestra is set up with cellos on the left next to the first violins, and basses, violas and second violins on the right, horns on the back left, trumpets (natural baroque ones) on the back right with the woodwinds in between.

Haydn’s Die Schöpfung, Sir John Eliot Gardiner and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique at Carnegie Hall

Joseph Haydn, Die Schöpfung Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Artistic Director and Conductor Carnegie Hall, Saturday, October 17, 2009 The Monteverdi Choir Lucy Crowe, Soprano Sophie Karthäuser, Soprano James Gilchrist, Tenor Vuyani Mlinde, Bass Matthew Rose, Bass…
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In Praise of Herbert von Karajan, with a Selective Critical Discography

My immediate reaction to Michael Miller’s commentary on the Karajan centenary [Oh no! He’s not back again, is he? – May 2, 2008] was rather choleric, but I’ve settled down a bit since then and can write this from a relatively balanced perspective.

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