Tag Archive: Ken Rus Schmoll

John Banville’s Love in the Wars after Kleist’s Penthesilea at Bard Summerscape

Chris Stack (Achilles) and Birgit Huppuch (Penthesilea) in Love in the Wars. Photo Cory Weaver.

If one has read one’s Classics, or has acquired a passion for ancient literature later in life and has read, say, Homer and the tragic poets with some attention, or, perhaps I should say, is older than fifty, one, in some human situation, whether intimate, passionate, urgent, or trivial, will occasionally get an uncanny feeling that one is living out Greek myth—that under one’s skin Achilles, Hermes, or Thetis are making us act and speak from within, as if we twenty-first century humans were nothing more than costumes for some drama of great antiquity that plays itself out continuously over millennia in strands intertwined with other narratives. Is this fate, or archetype, or merely common or garden human nature, observed as keenly by Homer, Pindar, and Euripides as by Dickens, Nietzsche, or Proust?

13P’s A Map of Virtue, by Erin Courtney

Jon Norman Schneider, Birgit Huppuch, Maria Striar (l-r) in Erin Courtney's, A Map of Virtue. Photo Scott Adkins.

For some of us, life is riddled with inexplicable coincidence and an uncanny way of repeating itself. These startling moments of synchronicity are often baffling, sometimes enlightening, always astonishing. They create curious patterns throughout our lives, connecting us to people and places we never would have otherwise noted. These reoccurring symbols often become, for those of us who experience this mysterious serendipity, the subject of obsession, of art, of deep psychological investigation. Are they signs from God? Are they manifestations of our subconscious—childhood traumas, perhaps, coming to light? Are they the universe’s whimsical reminders that we are all one, that all of space and time is eternally connected and inextricably linked?

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