Tag Archive: Krzysztof Urbański

Krzysztof Urbański and Augustin Hadelich impress with the San Francisco Symphony

Krzysztof Urbański. Photo Maria Maślanka.

You never know when San Francisco will prove even weirder than you think, but Fleet Week is surely a good candidate for strangeness at the symphony. The US Navy’s Blue Angels air ballet is a reliable tourist magnet when it comes to town, drawing unaccustomed crowds far and wide, and some visitors, suitably strafed and deafened, wind up at the symphony. This explains Bermuda shorts and flip flops in Saturday’s audience and a tendency to applaud in the wrong places. I’m not sure it explains an ill-tempered dowager who shouted her disapproval of the music and had to be removed. Nor did anyone, official or otherwise, manage to decode bizarre noises repeatedly emanating from, well. somewhere….I get ahead of myself. It was an interesting evening!

A Crop of Recordings VIII

Maurice Ravel

“If only I had known it could be done like this!” So enthused Brahms the first time he heard Dvořák’s Cello Concerto—then as now probably the greatest work for cello and orchestra ever written. “If only Brahms could hear this performance,” I’m tempted to say! Thomas Dausgaard seems to have a musical green thumb. Touch something and it springs to life with unexpected flips of energy and color—Schubert and Schumann Symphonies with his Swedish Chamber Orchestra only among the most recent successes.

Krzysztof Urbański Debuts with Emanuel Ax and the San Francisco Symphony in Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto and Dvořák’s “New World” Symphony

Krzysztof Urbański conducts. Photo by Maria Maślanka

This was an old-fashioned program — the kind audiences like. Two grand and tuneful symphonic works. A venerated pianist. The debut of a young matinee idol conductor. And last but not least, total absence of any threatening nouvelle cuisine for the ear. So how did it go, this debut?

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