Bard Music Festival 2014 - Schubert and his World
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Posts Tagged ‘Lincoln Center’

Thumbnail : Ann, Written and Performed by Holland Taylor, at the Lincoln Center Theater

Ann, Written and Performed by Holland Taylor, at the Lincoln Center Theater

Ann written and performed by Holland Taylor directed by Benjamin Endsley Klein sets by Michael Fagin costumes by Julie Weiss lighting by Matthew Richards sound by Ken Huncovsky; projections by Zachary Borova wig design by Paul Huntley production manager, Peter Fulbright production stage manager, J. P. Elins general manager, 101 Productions Ltd. Lincoln Center Theater […]

Thumbnail : Valery Gergiev and the London Symphony Orchestra Open the Symphonic Masters Series at Lincoln Center

Valery Gergiev and the London Symphony Orchestra Open the Symphonic Masters Series at Lincoln Center

Lincoln Center’s acclaimed Great Performers series began its 2012/13 Symphonic Masters lineup with two outstanding performances by the London Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of its principal conductor, Valery Gergiev. Each of the all-Brahms programs featured a concerto and a symphony by the composer. The first concert took the audience on a transformative journey from […]

Thumbnail : Looking Back and Looking Forward: Takács String Quartet in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series

Looking Back and Looking Forward: Takács String Quartet in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series

Lincoln Center: October 25 2012 Haydn – String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Britten – String Quartet No. 2 Shostakovich – Piano Quintet Marc-André Hamelin – piano The Takács Quartet Edward Dusinberre – violin Károly Schranz – violin Geraldine Walther – viola András Fejér – cello The recent Lincoln Center Great Performers concert of the […]

Thumbnail : The New York City Ballet’s All Balanchine and Stravinsky Festival

The New York City Ballet’s All Balanchine and Stravinsky Festival

The New York City Ballet began its fall season at the David H. Koch Theater with a three-program tribute to the legendary choreographer/composer duo of Balanchine and Stravinsky. The first installment (which this reviewer unfortunately did not see) featured the classic Greek trilogy of Orpheus, Apollo, and Agon. The second program comprised the most overtly Russian collaborations of the two artists, drawing upon their common background in rich folk and fairy tale traditions.

Thumbnail : Étoiles From Paris and Stars From Australia: A Dance Preview of the 2012 Lincoln Center Festival

Étoiles From Paris and Stars From Australia: A Dance Preview of the 2012 Lincoln Center Festival

Lincoln Center, David H. Koch Theater (unless otherwise noted): June 12 – August 5 (the Lincoln Center Festival begins July 5) Please see below for schedule. The Australian Ballet, which tends to tour “overseas” once a year, will come to Lincoln Center first, in June, with Australia’s main indigenous contemporary dance company the Bangarra Dance […]

Thumbnail : New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert, Music Director: 2011–12 Season Preview and Concert Schedule

New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert, Music Director: 2011–12 Season Preview and Concert Schedule

  Alan Gilbert is about to begin his third season as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, and he appears to remain as popular as ever. His particular combination of rapport with the orchestra, solid, insightful, often brilliant musicianship, flair for programming, and a winning, articulate manner have won him a support among the […]

Thumbnail : Emanuel Ax plays Schubert, Mostly Late, at Tully Scope

Emanuel Ax plays Schubert, Mostly Late, at Tully Scope

The first evening of Tully Scope devoted to the classical music of the past was no less adventurous than the first two concerts, which revolved around the work of Morton Feldman, who was one of the great musical adventurers of his generation. Emanuel Ax, a fastidious piano virtuoso who combines impeccable taste and restraint with a deep respect for the classics, is fairly new to late Schubert, as I understand. The late piano sonatas in particular, works of grand scope, rich harmony, and deep feeling, offer little in the way of purely pianistic attractions to show off Mr. Ax’s fluent technique. I almost feared that his mastery of the keyboard might even get in the way of Schubert’s music. These moving performances, on the contrary, went beyond mere elegance and delved deeply into the heart of Schubert’s writing. Emanuel Ax did indeed approach the music as a pianist, but, as always for him, the music came first, and that led him in new directions, which he navigated in a way entirely his own.

Thumbnail : Axiom, Juilliard’s Contemporary Music Group, play Feldman and Kurtág at Tully Scope

Axiom, Juilliard’s Contemporary Music Group, play Feldman and Kurtág at Tully Scope

The second concert in Lincoln Center’s wonderful Tully Scope Festival, like the opening night, revolved around the music of Morton Feldman, and, although it was entitled “For Morton Feldman,” it was actually dedicated to quite a different composer, György Kurtág, who is still very much alive and celebrated his eighty-fifth birthday on February 19th, only a month younger than Feldman would have been if he had not died prematurely in 1987 at the age of sixty-one. The program consists entirely of some of their best-known works, played by Axiom, the contemporary music group of the Juilliard School, under the direction of Jeffrey Milarsky, and the Clarion Choir under music director Steven Fox. The instrumentalists and the soprano soloist were all students or recent graduates of Juilliard, who acquitted themselves most impressively.

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  • A Singer’s Notes 93: Denève, the TMC Orchestra, and Berlioz; McGegan and Handel; Bernstein’s Candide at Tanglewood
    The excellent Stephane Denève chose two works of Hector Berlioz for his TMCO concert. Wholly remarkable was a performance of Les Nuits d'Été. The maestro gave these songs a sound I've never heard before. It was ravishingly quiet to begin with, not unlike the nearly silent playing Simon Rattle can achieve in his Mahler performances. It was like some
    Keith Kibler
  • Murder Myth Married to Music—Lizzie Borden Wields her Axe at Tanglewood
    In Jack Beeson and Kenward Elmslie’s 1965 retelling, Lizzie Borden is unequivocally presented the murderer of her step-mother and father; in the opening moments, as the orchestra starts up with a scream of outrage, Lizzie runs onstage with an axe and plants it firmly in the middle of the family table. It remains there for most of the opera, sometimes reached
    Larry Wallach
  • A Singer’s Notes 92: The Cherry Orchard
    The Cherry Orchard At Historic Park-McCullough in North Bennington, VT July 31 – August 9 Most remarkable in Living Room Theatre’s The Cherry Orchard by Chekhov on Friday night was a natural sounding translation of the play – something I have rarely heard. This was accomplished by the young actress who also played Anya, along with Randolyn Zinn. […] The post
    Keith Kibler
  • A Singer’s Notes 91: TMC Forever, and A Little Bit of Marlboro
    The Tanglewood Center Music Orchestra took on an enormous challenge in their first outing this summer. The Bruckner 4th Symphony is a magnificent leviathan of a piece which requires everything of its players and its conductor. The young French horn section deserves multiple plaudits. This work is one of the supreme tests of orchestral horn […] The post A Sin
    Keith Kibler