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Fisher Center, Bard College, Fall Events 2014
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Posts Tagged ‘Lincoln Center’

Thumbnail : Mikhailovsky Ballet Performs The Flames of Paris

Mikhailovsky Ballet Performs The Flames of Paris

Move over Les Miz! The Flames of Paris is an opulent, highly muscular, charged ballet that’s mass entertainment complete with sward-fighting, clog dancing, folk music and enough revolutionary zeal to please any audience. It also makes the French Revolution look like an event that took place between dessert and coffee – no guillotines, no blood and almost no tragedy if you don’t count the two on-stage deaths that register more as plot lines than emotional grabbers.

Thumbnail : Mostly Mozart, Hold the Mozart: the International Contemporary Ensemble and Ellie Dehn perform Fujikura, Zorn, Lucier, and Messiaen at the Park Avenue Armory

Mostly Mozart, Hold the Mozart: the International Contemporary Ensemble and Ellie Dehn perform Fujikura, Zorn, Lucier, and Messiaen at the Park Avenue Armory

ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble) has become a fixture at what might once have been considered and unlikely event, Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival. In recent years it has devloped into a more eclectic sort of festival, grounded in the music of Mozart as always, but including baroque and classical music played on period instruments as well as contemporary music. Within a few weeks Mostly Mozart provides a condensation of our musical interests today. It is especially welcome to get some taste of the rich contemporary music life in the City, when it inevitably thins out for the summer, as composers, many of whom teach for a living, go off to the country or an arts center to compose, perhaps with a visit to the Festival of Contemporary Music at Tanglewood or some other opportunity to congregate with colleagues and hear each other’s work.

Thumbnail : Ann, Written and Performed by Holland Taylor, at the Lincoln Center Theater

Ann, Written and Performed by Holland Taylor, at the Lincoln Center Theater

Ann written and performed by Holland Taylor directed by Benjamin Endsley Klein sets by Michael Fagin costumes by Julie Weiss lighting by Matthew Richards sound by Ken Huncovsky; projections by Zachary Borova wig design by Paul Huntley production manager, Peter Fulbright production stage manager, J. P. Elins general manager, 101 Productions Ltd. Lincoln Center Theater […]

Thumbnail : Valery Gergiev and the London Symphony Orchestra Open the Symphonic Masters Series at Lincoln Center

Valery Gergiev and the London Symphony Orchestra Open the Symphonic Masters Series at Lincoln Center

Lincoln Center’s acclaimed Great Performers series began its 2012/13 Symphonic Masters lineup with two outstanding performances by the London Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of its principal conductor, Valery Gergiev. Each of the all-Brahms programs featured a concerto and a symphony by the composer. The first concert took the audience on a transformative journey from […]

Thumbnail : Looking Back and Looking Forward: Takács String Quartet in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series

Looking Back and Looking Forward: Takács String Quartet in Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series

Lincoln Center: October 25 2012 Haydn – String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Britten – String Quartet No. 2 Shostakovich – Piano Quintet Marc-André Hamelin – piano The Takács Quartet Edward Dusinberre – violin Károly Schranz – violin Geraldine Walther – viola András Fejér – cello The recent Lincoln Center Great Performers concert of the […]

Thumbnail : The New York City Ballet’s All Balanchine and Stravinsky Festival

The New York City Ballet’s All Balanchine and Stravinsky Festival

The New York City Ballet began its fall season at the David H. Koch Theater with a three-program tribute to the legendary choreographer/composer duo of Balanchine and Stravinsky. The first installment (which this reviewer unfortunately did not see) featured the classic Greek trilogy of Orpheus, Apollo, and Agon. The second program comprised the most overtly Russian collaborations of the two artists, drawing upon their common background in rich folk and fairy tale traditions.

Thumbnail : Étoiles From Paris and Stars From Australia: A Dance Preview of the 2012 Lincoln Center Festival

Étoiles From Paris and Stars From Australia: A Dance Preview of the 2012 Lincoln Center Festival

Lincoln Center, David H. Koch Theater (unless otherwise noted): June 12 – August 5 (the Lincoln Center Festival begins July 5) Please see below for schedule. The Australian Ballet, which tends to tour “overseas” once a year, will come to Lincoln Center first, in June, with Australia’s main indigenous contemporary dance company the Bangarra Dance […]

Thumbnail : New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert, Music Director: 2011–12 Season Preview and Concert Schedule

New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert, Music Director: 2011–12 Season Preview and Concert Schedule

  Alan Gilbert is about to begin his third season as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, and he appears to remain as popular as ever. His particular combination of rapport with the orchestra, solid, insightful, often brilliant musicianship, flair for programming, and a winning, articulate manner have won him a support among the […]

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  • A Singer’s Notes 101: Except ye become as children …
    My weekend has been dominated by children, their thoughts, and my thoughts about them. Charles Dickens, a passionate admirer of little ones, finds his most searing location for them in his beloved A Christmas Carol. Even the death of Little Dorrit lacks the resonance that this short novella has shown. The attachment with Christmas is […]
    Keith Kibler
  • The BEMF Chamber Operas 2014: Pergolesi’s La serva padrona and Livietta e Tracollo
    Pergolesi’s comic operas sound remarkably modern—which is to say, like Mozart. Recognizably human characters go through recognizable experiences, singing out their feelings very directly, which the music embodies in fluidly changing tempos and moods, stretching of harmony, changes of key and orchestral color. Much is accomplished through musically creative recitative—a half-spoken way of proceeding—as well […]
    Charles Warren
  • What is and what might have been: More Nelsons at the BSO, Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra
    I couldn’t have been more eager to hear Riccardo Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra on their return visit to Boston, part of an American tour celebrating the 25th anniversary of the “Peaceful Revolution” that began in Leipzig in October 1989 and a month later led to the fall of the Berlin wall. Chailly continues […]
    Lloyd Schwartz
  • A Singer’s Notes 100: Shakespeare and Company’s Fall Festival
    A good while ago now, I stepped into an ancient school bus, left a tiny hamlet in the foothills of the Adirondacks, and traveled to the glittering metropolis of Johnstown, New York. There, The Tempest was being played by a traveling troupe, and somehow our country school got us there. The play was The Tempest. […]
    Keith Kibler

New York Arts is dedicated to bringing you the best critical writing about the arts, in-depth, and written by passionate, engaging writers.

 
Every page on the site is free, and so are subscriptions to our email updates.
 
New York Arts survives on your voluntary support.
 
Why?
 
A. Our writers are professionals and should be paid for their work, and so should the editors, who also carry out the everyday tasks of maintaining the site and business.
 
B. There are daily costs in maintaining the site, transportation, professional expenses, and so on...to a long list.
 
C. The editor currently takes on all the administrative work. We need a specialized assistant/administrator.
 
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to The Arts Press, publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Or click on the notice in the sidebar. The Arts Press is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the charitable purposes of The Arts Press must be made payable to“Fractured Atlas” only and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.
 
If you enjoy what your read here, support New York Arts and keep serious criticism alive! You won't find it in your local newspaper anymore!