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New York Arts is dedicated to bringing you the best critical writing about the arts, in-depth, and written by passionate, engaging writers.

 
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Posts Tagged ‘New York Philharmonic’

Thumbnail : Lorin Maazel: a Few post Mortem Memories and Reflections

Lorin Maazel: a Few post Mortem Memories and Reflections

I wish I had thought of it first: “The Man Who Knew Too Much.” That was how the papers received Lorin Maazel’s death. And it’s a telling remark for anyone who reminisces about the conductor. Maazel was a genius who solved differential calculus problems for fun. He bored easily, was prone to arrogance, and it became his tendency to pull music around until it interested him again. This did not always work with audiences. At times the music could sound like an equation, itself.

Thumbnail : Rudolf Buchbinder plays the Brahms Second Piano Concerto with the New York Philharmonic under Alan Gilbert; Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique”

Rudolf Buchbinder plays the Brahms Second Piano Concerto with the New York Philharmonic under Alan Gilbert; Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique”

New York Philharmonic Avery Fisher Hall February 16, 2013 Alan Gilbert, conductor Rudolf Buchbinder, piano Brahms – Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat Major, Op. 83 Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 6, “Pathétique” Imagine a kinder, gentler nineteenth century, one not with Schopenhauer, but Oprah, as the Prime Comforter—a time when Johannes Brahms might have found antibiotics […]

Thumbnail : An Elegant Evening in Imperial Austria: Mozart and Mahler by the New York Philharmonic

An Elegant Evening in Imperial Austria: Mozart and Mahler by the New York Philharmonic

The New York Philharmonic sounded particularly courtly under the direction of Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos in a recent program of Mozart and Mahler. Already the entrance of the maestro, tall, magisterial, and impeccable in his tails, transported one back to the golden days of music-making in Imperial Vienna. Conducting from a seated position on the […]

Thumbnail : Birthday Bashes Abound in the Big Apple: Garrison Keillor at 70 and Barbara Cook at 85

Birthday Bashes Abound in the Big Apple: Garrison Keillor at 70 and Barbara Cook at 85

It isn’t often that two luminaries of the entertainment world publicly mark major milestones in the same week and city. Yet such was the case last week in New York: on Tuesday, Garrison Keillor reflected upon seven decades of life in a special appearance with the New York Philharmonic, and on Thursday, Barbara Cook celebrated her eighty-fifth birthday in Carnegie Hall, exactly one week in anticipation of the actual day.

Thumbnail : Emanuel Ax Plays Bach and Schoenberg with the New York Philharmonic and Alan Gilbert…and Mozart’s “Linz” Symphony

Emanuel Ax Plays Bach and Schoenberg with the New York Philharmonic and Alan Gilbert…and Mozart’s “Linz” Symphony

I was so delighted by Emanuel Ax’s performance of Schoenberg’s Piano Concerto with the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra under Ken-David Masur that I didn’t want to miss an opportunity to hear him play it again. They created a crystalline texture with their alert interactions, with all the incisiveness of the best chamber music playing. Not exactly what one associates with the New York Philharmonic, as excellent an orchestra as they have been, since Kurt Masur’s t years, but, in my experience, Alan Gilbert is strong with twentieth century Music, and it seemed like a promising combination to say the least…and it did work, although in a way quite different from the Tanglewood performance.

Thumbnail : The New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert, conductor; Yefim Bronfman, piano; at Davies Hall, San Francisco, play Dvořák, Lindberg, and Tchaikovsky

The New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert, conductor; Yefim Bronfman, piano; at Davies Hall, San Francisco, play Dvořák, Lindberg, and Tchaikovsky

I caught recently one of the concerts given in Davies Hall by the New York Philharmonic, my old hometown band, as part of our 100th Anniversary Season. It was enough to set me thinking again about the role a good hall plays in shaping the fame of an ensemble.

Fifty years of struggle with the Lincoln Center acoustic has clearly left its mark on the New York orchestra’s reputation — though I must say not on the quality of its playing — which remains stunningly world class. But one is surprised to find in the sonority a burnished warmth and tonal delicacy similar to that of the Cleveland Orchestra. Understated tonal virtues have seldom been possible at Broadway and 65th Street. At least in the way we think of the orchestra. But they were notable here and speak well of Alan Gilbert’s Music Directorship.

Thumbnail : The New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert, conductor; Yefim Bronfman, piano; at Davies Hall, San Francisco, play Dvořák, Lindberg, and Tchaikovsky

The New York Philharmonic; Alan Gilbert, conductor; Yefim Bronfman, piano; at Davies Hall, San Francisco, play Dvořák, Lindberg, and Tchaikovsky

Alan Gilbert and the New York Philharmonic. Photo Chris Lee. The New York Philharmonic Alan Gilbert, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano Davies Hall, San Francisco Sunday, May 13, 2012 Dvořák – Carnival Overture, Opus 92 Lindberg – Piano Concerto No. 2 Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 4 in F Minor, Opus 36 I caught recently one of the concerts given in […]

Thumbnail : The New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert Music Director, 2009-2010 Season Preview

The New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert Music Director, 2009-2010 Season Preview

The New York Philharmonic, Alan Gilbert Music Director, 2009-2010 Season Preview Opening Night Gala: Magnus Lindberg, Messiaen, and Berlioz Avery Fisher Hall Free Open Rehearsal, 9:45 A.M. Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 7:30 P.M. Live From Lincoln Center Alan Gilbert, Conductor Renée Fleming, Soprano Magnus Lindberg   Expo (World Premiere–New York Philharmonic Commission) Messiaen    Poèmes Pour Mi […]

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  • A Singer’s Notes 101: Except ye become as children …
    My weekend has been dominated by children, their thoughts, and my thoughts about them. Charles Dickens, a passionate admirer of little ones, finds his most searing location for them in his beloved A Christmas Carol. Even the death of Little Dorrit lacks the resonance that this short novella has shown. The attachment with Christmas is […]
    Keith Kibler
  • The BEMF Chamber Operas 2014: Pergolesi’s La serva padrona and Livietta e Tracollo
    Pergolesi’s comic operas sound remarkably modern—which is to say, like Mozart. Recognizably human characters go through recognizable experiences, singing out their feelings very directly, which the music embodies in fluidly changing tempos and moods, stretching of harmony, changes of key and orchestral color. Much is accomplished through musically creative recitative—a half-spoken way of proceeding—as well […]
    Charles Warren
  • What is and what might have been: More Nelsons at the BSO, Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra
    I couldn’t have been more eager to hear Riccardo Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra on their return visit to Boston, part of an American tour celebrating the 25th anniversary of the “Peaceful Revolution” that began in Leipzig in October 1989 and a month later led to the fall of the Berlin wall. Chailly continues […]
    Lloyd Schwartz
  • A Singer’s Notes 100: Shakespeare and Company’s Fall Festival
    A good while ago now, I stepped into an ancient school bus, left a tiny hamlet in the foothills of the Adirondacks, and traveled to the glittering metropolis of Johnstown, New York. There, The Tempest was being played by a traveling troupe, and somehow our country school got us there. The play was The Tempest. […]
    Keith Kibler

New York Arts is dedicated to bringing you the best critical writing about the arts, in-depth, and written by passionate, engaging writers.

 
Every page on the site is free, and so are subscriptions to our email updates.
 
New York Arts survives on your voluntary support.
 
Why?
 
A. Our writers are professionals and should be paid for their work, and so should the editors, who also carry out the everyday tasks of maintaining the site and business.
 
B. There are daily costs in maintaining the site, transportation, professional expenses, and so on...to a long list.
 
C. The editor currently takes on all the administrative work. We need a specialized assistant/administrator.
 
Click here to make your tax-deductible donation to The Arts Press, publisher of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Or click on the notice in the sidebar. The Arts Press is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the charitable purposes of The Arts Press must be made payable to“Fractured Atlas” only and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.
 
If you enjoy what your read here, support New York Arts and keep serious criticism alive! You won't find it in your local newspaper anymore!