Coming Up and Of Note

Coming Up and Of Note

Extraordinary Brahms and Shostakovich from Tonu Kalam and the UNC Symphony Orchestra

It's not our custom to review performances we post, but I will say a few words about this concert. Brahms's Third Symphony is notoriously difficult to perform successfully. I have heard great conductors fail in it. The Toscanini story is famous. None of his NBC Symphony performances quite gel, and there was always much discussion about why this particular symphony, which seemed so well-suited to his temperament evaded him, until his splendid performance with the Philharmonia Orchestra became generally available as a recording many years after his last visit to London at the very end of his career. The puzzlement about Nelsons' recent performance with the BSO is another case in point. Tonu Kalam has no such problem here. By adopting a gentle, lyrical approach to the work, Kalam achieves a performance that is musically and emotionally coherent—one of the finest I've heard.
Coming Up and Of Note

Beethoven: a Premiere Anniversary on Saturday, March 1, at 7:30PM at the Church of the Epiphany

For the last two years Grand Harmonie has presented concerts of early chamber music – and sometimes larger ensemble music – that feature historically accurate wind and brass instruments. Now this group of young musicians from New York and Boston is growing into a full period instrument orchestra focused on 19th-century repertoire.
Coming Up and Of Note

Thank you!!! Because of your donations New York Arts now qualifies for grants from private and government foundations.

Thanks to the generosity of some of our readers, we are now eligible for grants from private and government foundations, which are as crucial to our public programs of concerts, exhibitions, and readings, as they are to vitality of New York Arts and The Berkshire Review. Of course your generosity at any level is warmly appreciated. But please continue your support! Private donations are essential to our ongoing operations, and foundations look for private community support in considering the awarding of grants.
Bard Music Festival

Sergey Ivanovich Taneyev’s Oresteia comes to Bard…then on to the Mariinsky!

Every summer, in the course of Bard College's Summerscape, the expansive net of entertainment, education, and enlightenment Leon Botstein and his cohorts cast about the Bard Music Festival, we get an opportunity to enjoy a rare opera, which has either fallen out of, or never entered, the basic repertory of the art form—an opera you will never see at the Met. In many cases the reasons these works disappeared is either straightforward or practical: tastes change, or the management of mainstream opera houses ceased to find it workable to engage a cast of six or eight lead singers when the most popular operas required only two. In other cases the reasons are mysterious, complex, or otherwise fascinating.
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