2008

Photography

Meeting Charis

I met Charis Wilson last summer at her friend Don’s house in Northern California. Charis, 94, wore black pants and a purple sweater and sat sprightly in a wheelchair. Her short hair was straight, smart, and delicate. She wore a purple headband and two bright blue hair combs. I immediately recognized her luminous face from Edward Weston’s photographs, taken over 70 years ago.
Wagner

Barenboim’s Tristan at the Met with Dalayman and Seiffert

 

 

A Weekend at the Opera, Part II: Richard Wagner, Tristan und Isolde
Metropolitan Opera Company, November 28, 2008

Tristan……………..Peter Seiffert
Isolde………………Katarina Dalayman
Kurwenal…………….Gerd Grochowski [Debut]
Brangäne…………….Michelle DeYoung
King Marke…………..René Pape
Melot……………….Stephen Gaertner
Sailor’s Voice……….Matthew Plenk
Shepherd…………….Mark Schowalter
Steersman……………James …

Theater

Black Watch

Black Watch
by Gregory Burke
Dir. John Tiffany
National Theatre of Scotland

St. Ann’s Warehouse, Brooklyn, October 25th, 2008

Gregory Burke’s Black Watch, the sensation of the 2006 Edinburgh Fringe Festival, has returned to Brooklyn’s St. Ann’s Warehouse …

Literature

Elizabeth Brundage, Somebody Else’s Daughter Viking, New York, 2008

Perhaps it is the relative ease, beauty, and quiet of the Berkshires—just the right remedy away from noisy New York and Boston...even Salem and Concord—that inspires writers. But certainly beginning in the 19th century through today Berkshire writers have had a consuming fascination with the mystery of place and how natural beauty and a closely hewn society are able to create the illusion of good in the presence of brooding evil. Elizabeth Brundage's psychological thriller, Someone Else's Daughter, is no different.
Art

Reflections on the Elgin Marbles

Rescue or looting? It’s disturbing to visit the Elgin Marbles at the British Museum, I find, because the eye notices their wreckage and beauty at the same time. One empire, the Ottoman, ignored the Parthenon as art, affixing a minaret to it and using it as a mosque. This neglect was probably better than the pillaging that another empire, the British, did after 1801, when Lord Elgin chivvied a document from the Turkish sultan that may or may not have allowed him to hack off and cart away half the friezes, pediment statues, and intermediate sculptures along the roof edge, or metopes. Elgin “rescued” enough precious art to strip the temple fairly bare. When he was nearly broke in 1816, the British government bought the marbles, after a queasy debate in Parliament that ended, basically, with “they’re ours now, nobody else can have them.”
WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com